Characterisation of Extreme Shape Materials: “Biomass and Waste Materials”

Biomass Handling

Characterisation of Extreme Shape Materials: “Biomass and Waste Materials”

Handling biomass and waste materials is very difficult especially when they are in bulk form. Various techniques have been developed and adopted to characterise these materials to support equipment design. These materials are classified as “Class 3” extreme shape materials (ESM) by The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology. In a PhD project at The Wolfson Centre, University of Greenwich, UK, further research work on the characterisation of ESM has been conducted, and various techniques have been developed and adopted to characterise the ESM.
(ed. WoMaMarcel - 29/7/2014)
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The widespread usage of biomass and waste materials to generate; electricity, transport fuels, bio-chemicals and biogas are very appealing for reducing carbon emissions and as an alternative source of energy in the face of limiting oil stocks. However handling these materials is very difficult especially when they are in bulk form. These materials are classified as “Class 3” extreme shape materials (ESM) by The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology based on their practical experiences in handling various forms of biomass and waste materials. Typical examples of ESM are woodchips, chopped miscanthus, sawdust, shredded paper, municipal solids waste (MSW) and corn stover. In a PhD project at The Wolfson Centre, University of Greenwich (United Kingdom) further research work on the characterisation of ESM has been conducted. Various techniques have been developed and adopted to characterise the ESM. Results have shown that ESM are resistant to flow/failure inside silos because of the following key factors: inherent low bulk density, inherent moisture content, high particle aspect ratio and their stress-phobic nature.
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